Items where Year is 2015

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Number of items: 33.

B

Para:BS 7273-4:2015 Code of practice for the operation of fire protection measures. Actuation of release mechanisms for doors

Offers recommendations for design, installation, commissioning and maintenance of electrical control arrangements for actuation of mechanisms that unlock, release or open doors in the event of fire. Looks at categories and methods of actuation.

Para:BS 9990:2015 Non-automatic fire-fighting systems in buildings - Code of practice

Presents good practice for the design, installation, testing and maintenance of non-automatic fire-fighting systems including wet and dry fire-fighting mains.

Para:BS 9990:2015 Fire safety in the design, management and use of residential buildings - code of practice (Incorporating corrigendum No. 1)

Provides recommendations and guidance for the design, management and use of residential buildings, focussing on ensuring the fire safety of all people. Applies to dwellings, residential accommodation blocks and specialised housing. Covers designing means of escape, active fire protection, construction design, stairs and exits, HVAC, ancillary accommodation to flats and maisonettes, access and fire-fighting facilities, and building works.

Para:BS EN 12101-3:2015 Smoke and heat control systems. Specification for powered smoke and heat control ventilators (fans)

Details are given for methods of test and the requirements for powered smoke and heat control ventilators (fans) which can be installed in ventilation systems. Also gives details for approval of a range of ventilators and their motors from a limited number of tests.

Para:BS EN 1366-2:2015 Fire resistance tests for service installations. Fire dampers

Details the method to determine fire resistance of fire dampers installed in fire separating elements which are designed to withstand heat and the passage of fire, smoke and gases at high temperature.

Para:BS EN 14306:2015 Thermal insulation products for building equipment and industrial installations. Factory made calcium silicate (CS) products. Specification

This European Standard specifies the requirements for factory made calcium silicate products which are used for the thermal insulation of building equipment and industrial installations with an operating temperature range of approximately - 170 °C to + 1 100 °C. Calcium silicate products can be used below - 50 °C. Below the operating temperature of - 50 °C, special tests, regarding the suitability of the product in the intended application are advised (e.g. liquefaction of oxygen). Manufacturer's advice should be heeded in all cases. The products are manufactured in the form of boards, pipe sections, segments and prefabricated ware. This European Standard describes product characteristics and includes procedures for testing, evaluation of conformity, marking and labelling. Products covered by this standard are also used in prefabricated thermal insulation systems and composite panels; the structural performance of systems incorporating these products is not covered. This European Standard does not specify the required level or class of a given property that should be achieved by a product to demonstrate fitness for purpose in a particular application. The levels required for a given application can be found in regulations and invitations to tender. Products with a declared thermal conductivity greater than 0,6 W/(m⋅K) at 10 °C are not covered by this standard. This European Standard does not cover products intended to be used for the insulation of the building structure. This European Standard does not cover the following acoustical aspects: direct airborne sound insulation and impact noise transmission index.

Para:BS EN 50200:2015 Method of test for resistance to fire of unprotected small cables for use in emergency circuits

Applicable to cables for emergency circuits, of rated voltage not exceeding 600/1000 V, including those of rated voltage below 80V, and for optical fibre cables.

Para:BS EN 81-20:2014 Safety rules for the construction and installation of lifts - lifts for the transport of persons and goods. Passenger and goods passenger lifts

Applies to permanently installed new passenger or goods passenger lifts, with traction, positive or hydraulic drive, serving defined landing levels. Looks at significant hazards, safety requirements, protective measures, verification and information for use.

Para:BS EN 81-72:2015 Safety rules for the construction and installation of lifts - particular applications for passenger and goods passenger lifts. Firefighters lifts (incorporating corrigendum July 2015)

Applies to lifts installed primarily for passengers’ use with additional protection, controls and signals which enable it to be used under the direct control of the fire service. Identifies significant associated hazards, and specifies safety requirements and protective measures. Also discusses verification procedure.

H

HSE Para:4.1 Appendix 4 The health and safety file

This Appendix gives guidance on the preparation, provision and retention of a health and safety file and the actions on each dutyholder.
Appendix 5 shows how the health and safety file relates to and influences other types of information during a construction project involving more than one contractor.

HSE Para:4.10 What must dutyholders do? The principal designer

The principal designer must prepare the health and safety file. They are
accountable to the client and should liaise closely to agree the structure and
content of the file as soon as practicable after appointment. In preparing the file,
the principal designer should expect the client to provide any health and safety file
that may exist from an earlier project.

HSE Para:4.11 What must dutyholders do? The principal designer

The principal designer must also cooperate with the rest of the project team
and should expect their cooperation in return. Cooperation with the principal contractor is particularly important in agreeing the structure and content of the
information included in the file. Liaison with designers and other contractors is also
important. They may hold information that is useful for the health and safety file,
which may be difficult to obtain after they have left the project.

HSE Para:4.12 What must dutyholders do? The principal designer

The principal designer, in cooperation with other members of the project team,
must also ensure that the file is appropriately updated, reviewed and revised to
ensure it takes account of any changes that occur as the project progresses.

HSE Para:4.13 What must dutyholders do? The principal designer

The principal designer must pass the updated file to the client at the end of the
project. In doing this, they should ensure the client understands the structure and
content of the file and its significance for any subsequent project. If the principal
designer’s appointment finishes before the end of the project, they must pass the
file to the principal contractor who must then take on responsibility for it. In doing
this, the principal designer should ensure the principal contractor is aware of any
outstanding issues that may need to be taken into account when reviewing,
updating and revising the file.

HSE Para:4.14 What must dutyholders do? The principal contractor

For the duration of the principal designer’s appointment, the principal
contractor plays a secondary role in ensuring the health and safety file is fit for
purpose. They must provide the principal designer with any relevant information that
needs to be included in the health and safety file.

HSE Para:4.15 What must dutyholders do? The principal contractor

Where the principal designer’s appointment finishes before the end of the
project, the principal contractor must take on responsibility for ensuring that the file
is reviewed, updated and revised for the remainder of the project. At the end of the
project the principal contractor must pass the file to the client. In doing this, they
should ensure the client understands the structure and content of the file and its
significance for any subsequent project.

HSE Para:4.16 What must dutyholders do? The contractor

The contractor has no specific duties placed on them in relation to the health
and safety file.

HSE Para:4.2 What is the health and safety file?

The health and safety file is defined as a file appropriate to the characteristics of
the project, containing relevant health and safety information to be taken into
account during any subsequent project. The file is only required for projects
involving more than one contractor.

HSE Para:4.3 What is the health and safety file?

The file must contain information about the current project likely to be needed to ensure health and safety during any subsequent work, such as maintenance,
cleaning, refurbishment or demolition. When preparing the health and safety file, information on the following should be considered for inclusion:
(a) a brief description of the work carried out;
(b) any hazards that have not been eliminated through the design and construction processes, and how they have been addressed (eg surveys or other information concerning asbestos or contaminated land);
(c) key structural principles (eg bracing, sources of substantial stored energy – including pre- or post-tensioned members) and safe working loads for floors and roofs;
(d) hazardous materials used (eg lead paints and special coatings);
(e) information regarding the removal or dismantling of installed plant and equipment (eg any special arrangements for lifting such equipment);
(f) health and safety information about equipment provided for cleaning or
maintaining the structure;
(g) the nature, location and markings of significant services, including underground cables; gas supply equipment; fire-fighting services etc;
(h) information and as-built drawings of the building, its plant and equipment (eg the means of safe access to and from service voids and fire doors).

HSE Para:4.3(a) What is the health and safety file?

The file must contain information about the current project likely to be needed to ensure health and safety during any subsequent work, such as maintenance,
cleaning, refurbishment or demolition. When preparing the health and safety file, information on the following should be considered for inclusion:
(a) a brief description of the work carried out;

HSE Para:4.3(b) What is the health and safety file?

The file must contain information about the current project likely to be needed to ensure health and safety during any subsequent work, such as maintenance,
cleaning, refurbishment or demolition. When preparing the health and safety file, information on the following should be considered for inclusion:
(b) any hazards that have not been eliminated through the design and construction processes, and how they have been addressed (eg surveys or other information concerning asbestos or contaminated land);

HSE Para:4.3(c) What is the health and safety file?

The file must contain information about the current project likely to be needed to ensure health and safety during any subsequent work, such as maintenance,
cleaning, refurbishment or demolition. When preparing the health and safety file, information on the following should be considered for inclusion:
(c) key structural principles (eg bracing, sources of substantial stored energy – including pre- or post-tensioned members) and safe working loads for floors and roofs;

HSE Para:4.3(d) What is the health and safety file?

The file must contain information about the current project likely to be needed to ensure health and safety during any subsequent work, such as maintenance,
cleaning, refurbishment or demolition. When preparing the health and safety file, information on the following should be considered for inclusion:
(d) hazardous materials used (eg lead paints and special coatings);

HSE Para:4.3(e) What is the health and safety file?

The file must contain information about the current project likely to be needed to ensure health and safety during any subsequent work, such as maintenance,
cleaning, refurbishment or demolition. When preparing the health and safety file, information on the following should be considered for inclusion:
(e) information regarding the removal or dismantling of installed plant and equipment (eg any special arrangements for lifting such equipment);

HSE Para:4.3(f) What is the health and safety file?

The file must contain information about the current project likely to be needed to ensure health and safety during any subsequent work, such as maintenance,
cleaning, refurbishment or demolition. When preparing the health and safety file, information on the following should be considered for inclusion:
(f) health and safety information about equipment provided for cleaning or
maintaining the structure;

HSE Para:4.3(g) What is the health and safety file?

The file must contain information about the current project likely to be needed to ensure health and safety during any subsequent work, such as maintenance,
cleaning, refurbishment or demolition. When preparing the health and safety file, information on the following should be considered for inclusion:
(g) the nature, location and markings of significant services, including underground cables; gas supply equipment; fire-fighting services etc;

HSE Para:4.3(h) What is the health and safety file?

The file must contain information about the current project likely to be needed to ensure health and safety during any subsequent work, such as maintenance,
cleaning, refurbishment or demolition. When preparing the health and safety file, information on the following should be considered for inclusion:
(h) information and as-built drawings of the building, its plant and equipment (eg the means of safe access to and from service voids and fire doors).

HSE Para:4.4 What is the health and safety file?

There should be enough detail to allow the likely risks to be identified and
addressed by those carrying out the work. However, the level of detail should be
proportionate to the risks. The file should not include things that will be of no help
when planning future construction work such as pre-construction information, the
construction phase plan, contractual documents, safety method statements etc.
Information must be in a convenient form, clear, concise and easily understandable.

HSE Para:4.5 What must dutyholders do? The client

The client must ensure that the principal designer prepares the health and safety
file for a project. As the project progresses, the client must ensure that the principal
designer regularly updates, reviews and revises the health and safety file to take
account of the work and any changes that have occurred. The client should be
aware that if the principal designer’s appointment finishes before the end of the
project, the principal designer must pass the health and safety file to the principal
contractor, who then must take on the responsibility for the file.
Information must be in a convenient form, clear, concise and easily understandable.

HSE Para:4.5 What must dutyholders do? The client

Once the project is finished, the client should expect the principal designer to
pass them the health and safety file. In cases where the principal designer has left
the project before it finishes, it will be for the principal contractor to pass the file to
the client.

HSE Para:4.7 What must dutyholders do? The client

The client must then retain the file and ensure it is available to anyone who may
need it for as long as it is relevant – normally the lifetime of the building – to enable
them to comply with health and safety requirements during any subsequent project.
It can be kept electronically, on paper, on film, or any other durable form.

HSE Para:4.8 What must dutyholders do? The client

If a client disposes of their interest in the building, they must give the file to the
individual or organisation who takes on the client duties and ensure that the new
client is aware of the nature and purpose of the file. If they sell part of a building,
any relevant information in the file must be passed or copied to the new owner. If
the client leases out all or part of the building, arrangements should be made for
the file to be made available to leaseholders. If the leaseholder acts as a client for a
future construction project, the leaseholder and the original client must arrange for
the file to be made available to the new principal designer.

HSE Para:4.9 What must dutyholders do? The designer

Where it is not possible to eliminate health and safety risks when preparing or
modifying designs, designers must ensure appropriate information is included in the
health and safety file about the reasonably practicable steps they have taken to
reduce or control those risks. This will involve liaising with:
(a) the principal designer, in helping them carry out their duty to prepare, update,
review and revise the health and safety file. This should continue for as long as
the principal designer’s appointment on the project lasts; or
(b) the principal contractor, where design work is carried out after the principal
designer’s appointment has finished and where changes need to be made to
the health and safety file. In these circumstances, it will be the principal
contractor’s duty to make those changes, but the designer must ensure that
the principal contractor has the appropriate information to update the file.
This information should be provided to the principal designer and principal
contractor as early as possible before the designer’s work ends on the project.

This list was generated on Thu Oct 21 20:16:07 2021 UTC.